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Hybrid Cloud

A hybrid cloud is a combination of two (or more) clouds. It is not a separate entity per se; rather, it is a term given to multiple clouds working in harmony. Generally speaking, it is used when customers require additional resources (e.g. on demand expansion) or additional services (e.g. cloud storage).

Hybrid cloud scenarios are shown in this diagram:

There are many hybrid cloud usage scenarios. For example, a customer may have an on-premises cloud that connects to a private cloud on either a single-tenant or multi-tenant platform, possibly for disaster recovery purposes. A different customer may have a private cloud as their main application and web hosting platform but uses a hybrid configuration onto our multi-tenant platform for burst capacity for online campaigns or when extra capacity is needed.

Hybrid cloud models open up a whole raft of new possibilities. Often, hybrid cloud for storage and backup is the first step on a customer’s journey to a broader cloud deployment. Whatever you are looking to achieve with a hosting solution, hybrid offers many new options and deployment models.

Most large organisations will use some form of hybrid cloud as they will invariably have some on-premise compute and storage resource for local processing needs and some short-term capacity needs too. In hybrid cloud scenarios, multi-tenant platforms are typically deployed as virtual private clouds due to the need for end-to-end security, firewalling, etc, to keep customer data safe.

Whatever you are looking to achieve with a hosting solution, hybrid offers many new options and deployment models.

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